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Study shows that smoking cannabis can lead to tooth loss

Sun

A new study has revealed that regular use of cannabis can lead to extensive tooth loss due to the fact that the habit leaves the person vulnerable to gum disease, which is a leading cause of tooth loss. The research involved over a thousand people who smoked the drug regularly for up to twenty years.

Periodontal disease (gum disease) is a very common condition, but marijuana can exacerbate the condition and lead to tooth loss in the early thirties, or certainly by middle age, with regular use.

The study was carried out by Dr Madeleine Meier, of Arizona State University, and involved 1037 people born in New Zealand between 1972 and 1973 and followed them until they reached 38. Lab tests checked gum health, as well as lung function, systemic inflammation and metabolic health. The results showed that regular use of the drug can cause devastating gum disease at a young age, and it has been suggested that this is because regular users neglect their dental health, not bothering to brush or floss to prevent the disease from developing. Previous research has also supported this theory and it has been found to significantly raise risk of gum disease among the younger generation.

 

 

Wolfsburg footballer suffers tooth loss on the pitch during game

Sat

 

A champion’s league match between Real Madrid and Wolfsburg finished 2-0 to the German team but it ended in disaster for a Portugal international as he faces dental work to replace a tooth lost on the pitch. Video of the injury has shown the tooth flying out of 30-year-old Vieirinha’s mouth as he fell to the ground after a clash with midfielder Toni Kroos.

The video was posted on Twitter and clearly shows a close-up of the collision, which lead to the Portuguese winger suffering an elbow in the mouth from the Real Madrid midfielder. He falls to the floor and immediately can be seen spitting his tooth out onto the pitch. OneFootball, who posted the video, added the caption ‘Damn! Looks like Vieirinha won a trip to the dentist!’ along with a sad face. Kroos appeared unhurt and did not require medical treatment.

Despite the wingers bad luck, his team did much better overall, with a 2-0 victory over the Spanish team, which consisted of a goal from the spot at 18 minutes after Casemiro brought down Wolfsburg’s Andre Schurrle, and a follow-up goal just seven minutes later as Maximillian Arnold converted a cross from Bruno Henrique.

 

Diabetics are at greater risk of tooth loss

Thu

A new study has revealed that people who live with diabetes are more vulnerable to dental decay and tooth loss; the research was released in Preventing Chronic Disease and it examined tooth-loss trends concerning 37,000 people over the age of 25 between the years 1971 and 2012. Over the forty year study, it was revealed that there were ‘substantial differences’ between adults without diabetes and those that were living with the condition.

In some areas of the study, there was twice as much tooth loss among diabetics, compared to non-diabetics.

Fortunately, the younger generation have shown better results, with less people in this population suffering tooth loss; researchers have suggested that this is related to better access to dental treatment and knowledge of good oral health, as well as improvements in dental hygiene and advances in technology.

Although it was not immediately obvious why people with diabetes would suffer more tooth loss than everyone else, scientists believe it may have something to do with gum disease, a problem which one in three diabetics suffer from. It is thought that high glucose levels in the blood and certain medications can contribute to the risks of developing gum disease.

 

Shane MacGowan gets new teeth; including a gold incisor

Mon

He has been living with tooth loss for decades, but now the Pogues front man Shane MacGowan has finally had restorative dental work done to replace his lost teeth; the singer destroyed his front teeth with drugs and alcohol over the years and had to get dental implants to replace them.

Shane, who celebrates his 58th birthday on Christmas day, has been able to eat an apple for the first time in three decades after undergoing six operations to repair the damage over the course of six months. Despite living without his teeth for many years, the singer did not think about doing anything drastic about the condition until his girlfriend of thirty years, Victoria Mary Clarke, suggested dental implants as a solution.

Rather than having a set of entirely white teeth, the singer has a single gold tooth over one incisor; as part of an overall design that has apparently been based on the teeth of actor Michael Fassbender. In order to get through the procedure, Shane hired a pranic healer, who provided a form of alternative medicine that was ‘better than any drug’ the singer has ever taken.

Shane’s journey to rebuild his broken smile will be chronicled in a new documentary entitled; Shane MacGowan; A Wreck Reborn, which airs on Sky Arts this week.

 

Diabetics are at greater risk of tooth loss

Tue

A new study has revealed that people who live with diabetes are more vulnerable to dental decay and tooth loss; the research was released in Preventing Chronic Disease and it examined tooth-loss trends concerning 37,000 people over the age of 25 between the years 1971 and 2012. Over the forty year study, it was revealed that there were ‘substantial differences’ between adults without diabetes and those that were living with the condition.

In some areas of the study, there was twice as much tooth loss among diabetics, compared to non-diabetics.

Fortunately, the younger generation have shown better results, with less people in this population suffering tooth loss; researchers have suggested that this is related to better access to dental treatment and knowledge of good oral health, as well as improvements in dental hygiene and advances in technology.

Although it was not immediately obvious why people with diabetes would suffer more tooth loss than everyone else, scientists believe it may have something to do with gum disease, a problem which one in three diabetics suffer from. It is thought that high glucose levels in the blood and certain medications can contribute to the risks of developing gum disease.

Woman tells of tooth loss ordeal after illegal whitening treatment

Mon

A mum has lost her two front teeth after illegal dental whitening – a treatment that should only be carried out by a dental professional – was performed on her teeth. Kellie Taylor, 43, is left wearing a denture after her teeth became weakened by the procedure and she had to have them removed. Kellie is now planning legal action against the beautician who whitened her teeth.

Natalie Kowalczyk was prosecuted by the dental regulator for carrying out teeth whitening illegally at a Lancaster salon. Kowalczyk was given a twelve month conditional discharge and ordered to pay Kelli £250 compensation for her pain and suffering, as well as £65 as a refund for the cost of treatment. However, Kellie does not feel this is enough, given the extent of her injuries. She said ‘it really annoyed me’, adding that she was glad about the outcome but it didn’t help her in the short-term.

Kellie describes her teeth feeling painful during the treatment but Natalie told her this was normal; however, her teeth were still ‘sore and sensitive’ afterwards for two weeks, forcing the mother to go to the dentist and find out what was wrong. The dentist told her that the bleaching product that had been used had penetrated the gums and weakened the teeth, leaving them beyond repair. Kellie now has to wear a denture to replace the two front teeth after they were extracted.

Teenagers are risking their teeth as they try out new ‘gap band’ trend

Tue

Orthodontic treatment can be a lengthy process and some teenagers just aren’t prepared to wait for their tooth gaps to be closed up using normal methods; lots of teens are risking tooth loss by trying out the new ‘gap band’ trend, which involves placing elastic bands around the teeth to pull them together and close up gaps. However, dentists are warning that anyone trying this is more likely to lose their teeth rather than get the perfect smile.

Numerous teens have posted videos of themselves starting the practice, according to The Metro, and some even claim that their tooth gaps were closed up in just a few weeks, compared to months or years it could take with conventional orthodontic treatment. Due to the price of dental care in the USA, this is becoming a popular trend across the pond, despite the risks of bone loss, root damage, and perhaps even tooth loss later on.

According to Juan Rendon, a Texas-based dentist who spoke to US website Refinery29, this practice could initially seem attractive as an alternative to expensive orthodontic treatment, but could ultimately leave the teeth in a very bad state. He said ‘when you move a tooth, the colour of the tooth might change because you are damaging the blood supply. You’re also going to have problems with your gums.’ If the gums are put under pressure this can cut off the blood supply and this can lead to inflammation, followed by infection and possibly tooth loss.

Expert warns that tongue piercings could ruin your teeth

Wed

According to one dental expert, tongue bars and studs are causing serious dental problems among young people, including cracks in the teeth, receding gums, and bone loss. A dentist from Canada has carried out extensive research into this problem and he doesn’t recommend getting a tongue piercing as it could cause serious conditions that may lead to tooth loss.

Dr Liran Levin, of the University of Alberta, says that playing with a tongue piercing in the mouth can cause irritation that could lead to recession of the gum tissue, which will eventually cause bone loss around the sockets. That’s not the worst of the problems though, Dr Levin warns that nerve damage, haemorrhaging, swelling, and infection could all flare up due to piercings in the mouth; he adds ‘When you’re sleeping and you clench your teeth, the piercing can break and be swallowed or inhaled as well. I see patients who have cracked teeth or receded gums and end up requiring a lot of dental treatment as a result.’

Over half of the young people questioned as part of the research complained of swelling in their mouth, while just under half said that bleeding was a problem due to their piercing. After examination, 14% were found to have fractured teeth and 26% had receding gums. Dr Levin says the risk of disease should not be ignored either and ‘proper sterilisation and infection control are also important when choosing a piercer. If you insist on getting an oral piercing, don’t play with it.’

Not brushing your teeth could cause serious health problems

Wed

An experiment has revealed that failing to properly brush your teeth could lead to dangerous health complications; the results were broadcast as part of a two-part series on dental health for the BBC. Dr Christoffer Van Tulleken was told to wear a gum guard on one side of his mouth so that his teeth could not be properly cleaned when he brushed every day; the experiment took place over a two week period and Dr Van Tulleken spoke to Mailonline about the results.

By the time the fortnight experiment was over, the Doctor had developed mild gum disease and was spitting blood after brushing; however, there was more to this than meets the eye and tests conducted by Professor Iain Chapple at the University of Birmingham School of Dentistry showed that his immune system had actually suffered some damage. Test results revealed that Christoffer’s white blood cells were less effective and chronic inflammation could also have damaged other cells in the body. The infection affected all of his body temporarily but long-term gum disease can push the immune system into overdrive, causing damage to other areas of the body on a more permanent basis.

Without treatment, gum disease can not only lead to tooth loss, it can also be a trigger for type 2 diabetes, dementia, and heart disease, with the gum infection causing chronic, irreversible damage to the body’s organs.

Dentist warn against DIY orthodontic treatment

Fri

There are many videos on the internet showing people who have supposedly straightened their teeth using DIY methods instead of going to see an orthodontist, but dentists are warning against this practice as it could lead to permanent tooth damage and possibly even tooth loss later on.

A woman from Washington State has more than 100,000 views on YouTube as she explains how she used elastic hair bands to bring her two front teeth together to close up a large gap in just 44 days. Although she is happy with the result, a New Jersey dentist has spoken to abcnews about the dangers of such practices; Dr Joseph Banker warned that moving the teeth too quickly can lead to root resorption, which may cause the teeth to become unstable and could even lead to tooth loss.

The American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics have also weighed in on the debate, saying that the rubber bands could slip under the gum line and it becomes extremely difficult ‘if not impossible’ to remove them and avoid infection. In a statement, the dental body explained that ‘the teeth extrude, the crowns fan out as the roots are pulled together, the teeth become increasingly mobile, and then they might just fall out.’

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