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Will new procedure help people afraid of emergency dentistry?

Thu

Emergency dentistry may soon be nothing to fear.A new procedure could help people who need treatment on their teeth but who are afraid of getting emergency dentistry.

Some professionals are now introducing so-called sleep dentistry in order to pacify their patients and make it easier for them to deal with their time in the chair, the Daily Planet Dispatch reports.

It involves the use of strong sedatives and local anaesthetics to create a dreamlike state that the patient will barely even remember afterwards.

However, it does not have the long recovery time or cause the inconvenience that a general anaesthetic would, because it wears off like a local.

Although many people have praised this as a way of reducing dental anxiety, some professionals have expressed concerns that improperly trained individuals may begin to administer the drugs.

Australia will introduce regulations governing sleep dentistry in July 2011 to get over this problem.

In November 2010, scientists at Kings College, Brunel University and the London South Bank University invented a device which cancels out the noise of the dentist's drill.
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People having root canal treatment ‘might want to look at the needle’

Thu

Having root canal treatment? Keep your eyes open!The advice from doctors is usually to look away when having injections, but people having root canal treatment and other surgeries might want to look at the needle before it goes in to their body.

A new study by researchers at University College London and University of Milan-Bicocca has found that the brain is more able to tolerate pain when it can see the cause than when it cannot.

Scientists used heat probes on the hands of subjects and found that they were able to withstand higher temperatures when they could see their hand than they could when it was blocked by a screen.

Co-author Professor Patrick Haggard told BBC News: "We've shown there is an interesting interaction between the brain's visual networks and the brain's pain networks."

Back in November 2010, scientists at Kings College, Brunel University and the London South Bank University announced they had created a device that cancels out the noise of the dentist's drill while still allowing the patient to hear the dentist and other sounds.
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Toothache ‘may need the advice of an emergency dentistry professional’

Fri

A serious toothache may call for emergency dentistry. People with toothache should seek the advice of an emergency dentistry professional in case it is something serious.

Medical News Today said that knowing what to do in certain dental emergency situations could mean the difference between keeping or losing a tooth.

In the event of a toothache, a minor one should be treated using a cold compress for 20 minutes to reduce swelling.

However, when it is extremely painful and goes on for a long time, patients should seek an emergency dentistry professional, the news provider said.

"The greatest risk comes if the toothache is from a bacterial infection. If left untreated, this could become life-threatening," it pointed out.

People who have been guilty of putting off dental treatment in the past may be pleased to know about a recent invention from scientists at Kings College, Brunel University and the London South Bank University, which cancels out the sound of the dentist's drill.

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Emergency dentistry patients ‘may not have to hear the drill’

Mon

Hearing the drill may soon be a thing of the past for emergency dentistry patients. People in need of emergency dentistry may soon no longer have to put up with the noise of the dentist's drill.

Scientists at Kings College, Brunel University and the London South Bank University have invented a device which cancels out the noise of the oral healthcare equipment while still allowing the patient to hear the dentist and other sounds.

It is plugged into an MP3 player or mobile phone and uses filtering to cancel out the noises that cause many people to fear going for emergency dentistry treatment.

Its creator Professor Brian Millar said he got the idea from car manufacturer Lotus, which was recently able to cancel out road noise while still allowing drivers to hear sirens and other potential dangers.

"The beauty of this gadget is that it would be fairly cost-effective for dentists to buy and any patient with an MP3 player would be able to benefit from it, at no extra cost," he added.

The British Dental Health Foundation recommends that anyone who suffers anxiety at the dentist should say so, as many professionals now offer some form of treatment for nervous patients.
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