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Big support for Mouth Cancer Action Month

Mon

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Big support for Mouth Cancer Action MonthA Luton dentist is among many professionals offering big support for Mouth Cancer Action Month. Dentists across the country are providing dental check-ups and information on mouth cancer awareness to help patients identify the signs. Mouth cancer can present itself in the form of tumours that develop in the lip, gums, or salivary glands, as well as on the tongue, or the floor of the mouth.

Mouth cancer has increased at an alarming rate and dentists all around the country are urging patients to be vigilant. Luckily, growing public awareness of mouth cancer is helping people to spot the signs sooner and know what to look for. However, there is still work to be done. Early detection can often mean better survival rates. This sentiment was echoed by the MyDentist clinical director, Nyree Whitley. “It’s not all bad news, by making sure patients have regular check-ups we can diagnose more mouth cancers at an early stage. Early treatment drastically increases the chances of beating the disease, as this prevents the cancer from developing.”

 

Pearl Dental Clinic is open 7 days a week from 9am to 10pm. You can book an appointment by calling 0203 750 5303 or emailing us or also by booking an appointment online.

Brushing at the wrong time can damage teeth

Tue

Brushing your teeth after every meal might seem like the right way to keep them strong and healthy, but dentists have warned that this can actually do more harm than good – especially if you have just eaten a rich meal, washed down with an acidic beverage. According to recent research, brushing within half an hour of eating can do real damage to the dentin layer beneath the enamel, because the acid levels in the mouth are higher after eating and brushing cannot remove the acid without damaging the tooth structure. Dr Howard R. Gamble, president of the Academy of General Dentistry spoke to the New York Times, explaining that ‘with brushing, you could actually push the acid deeper into the enamel and the dentin.’

As part of a study to test the theory,  volunteers wore human dentin samples in their mouth and tested different brushing routines; the results showed that brushing within an hour of drinking something acidic ‘stripped’ the teeth of their minerals, and waiting twenty minutes after a soft drink also did considerable damage. However, there is some good news, as the effect seems to be minimalised after about an hour; the researchers who carried out the study revealed that ‘after intra-oral periods of 30 and 60 mins, wear was not significantly higher than in unbrushed controls. It is concluded that for protection of dentin surfaces, at least 30 mins should elapse before tooth brushing after an erosive attack.’

Acidic energy drinks are destroying young people’s teeth

Wed

Energy drinks, such as Red Bull and Monster Energy are destroying teenager’s teeth a study at the Academy of General Dentistry in the US has claimed. According to the research, the beverages have such a high acid content that they can cause enamel erosion in as little as five days.

Author of the paper, Dr Poonam Jain, said that most of the patients were surprised to learn that energy drinks were the cause of their dental problems, and many were consuming them in the belief that they were choosing the healthy option; ‘Young adults consume these drinks assuming that they will improve their sports performance and energy levels and that they are ‘better’ for them than soda.’ Dr Jain added that these products were ‘essentially bathing their teeth with acid.’

Although the acid levels in the drinks vary from brand to brand, the researchers found that irreversible damage could be done to the enamel surface of the teeth in only a few days, particularly if the person was to drink one every couple of hours. It was also revealed that energy drinks were almost twice as harmful as sports drinks.

Spokesperson for the Academy, Dr Jennifer Bone, said that teenagers often come to her with toothache and decay without understanding the cause; ‘We review their diet and snacking habits and then we discuss their consumption of these beverages. They don’t realise that something as seemingly harmless as a sports or energy drink can do a lot of damage to their teeth.’

Pregnant women ‘should take care to avoid emergency dentistry’

Fri

Pregnant women may need to work harder to prevent emergency dentistry.Women who are pregnant need to pay particular attention to their oral health regime in order to avoid emergency dentistry.

This is according to a new article published in the healthcare journal General Dentistry, which warned that some conditions could be more prevalent among expectant mothers.

Lead author Crystal McIntosh explained that swollen gums, small cysts in the mouth and gingivitis can all occur during pregnancy.

In fact, some women can experience 100 per cent more gingivitis on average than is the case among females who are not pregnant.

However, Ms McIntosh said those planning a family should not be too worried and should simply try to be a little more diligent with brushing and flossing.

"It typically disappears three to six months after delivery provided that proper oral hygiene measures are implemented," she added.

The Cosmetic Dentistry Guide also states that women should not believe the myth that mothers lose a tooth for every child, providing they brush and floss regularly.
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Gum recession ‘a sign of poor oral health’

Thu

Receding gums have been described as a sign that a person is not taking sufficient care with their oral health and could lead to problems in the future, it has been claimed.

MC Ortega wrote in her blog for Empowher that gums typically recede over many years, often among the over-40s but sometimes it can begin in the teenage years.

She noted: "Gum recession symptoms include hypersensitive teeth, the roots of the tooth are exposed and visible, the tooth feels notched at the gum line, change in the tooth’s colour and cavities below the gum line."

Elsewhere, research carried out by the Academy of General Dentistry recently showed that the top cause of sensitive teeth is individuals brushing too aggressively.

The study revealed that heavy-handed brushing can rub away the dentin which protects the teeth and could lead them to becoming porous, providing access to underlying nerves and making the teeth painful.
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Brits ‘should not ignore sensitive teeth’

Fri

Britons who have sensitive teeth should not ignore the problem and instead should book a check-up with an emergency dentist to assess the issue.

A survey conducted by the Academy of General Dentistry revealed sensitive teeth can be a sign of enamel erosion or indicate receding gums, both problems which people should talk to their dentist about in order to resolve the issue.

In addition, individuals suffering from a dry mouth might also want to consult their dentist.

Dr Gigi Meinecke commented: "This is a problem because these oral conditions can lead to serious consequences."

Meanwhile, a study was recently carried out at the University of Gothenburg which showed that foods with a high alkaline content could be damaging to the organic parts of the teeth. As a result, researchers noted that those who eat alkaline-rich foods are more likely to develop sensitive teeth and see erosion of their tooth enamel.
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