Twitter FaceBook
Special Offers!

IDHF expands product scheme to overseas

Wed

IDHF expands product scheme to overseasMembers of the public who purchase high-quality products to ensure they can prevent emergency dentistry could be interested in news from the British Dental Health Foundation (BDHF).

As part of recent plans, the International Dental Health Foundation (IDHF) has announced plans to extend its Product Accreditation scheme to overseas locations.

The programme, which was established in 1991, sees hygiene items examined by staff from the official body to ensure they meet the highest standards.

Since its launch, more than 500 products have been given the seal of approval by the IDHF following tests to check company claims are clinically proven.

Dr Nigel Carter, chief executive of the BDHF, said: "Here in the UK … Our logo is being used by three out of the five top retailers of oral healthcare products – Asda, Tesco and Morrisons."

This news comes after the organisation warned the working public to ensure their oral hygiene does not slip during long periods of time in the office every day.ADNFCR-2621-ID-800695582-ADNFCR

Daily routine should include oral hygiene, says BDHF

Mon

Daily routine should include oral hygiene, says BDHFIndividuals looking to make improvements to their oral health in a bid to prevent emergency dentistry could benefit from recent advice from the British Dental Health Foundation (BDHF).

The organisation has urged members of the public to take note of their daily routines in a bid to establish how they can improve the condition of their teeth and gums.

Its advice comes after researchers from the Office for National Statistics discovered that 18,000 UK residents missed work in the final quarter of 2010 as a result of mouth and dental problems.

For this reason, the BDHF's chief executive Dr Nigel Carter has recommended small changes to dental hygiene routines in a bid to eradicate the need for sick days.

"It is wholly better if you stick to three square meals a day, but if you do snack, select savoury snacks such as cheese, nuts, breadsticks and raw vegetables," he added.

Healthyteeth.org urges members of the public to use dental products containing fluoride in order to strengthen teeth and protect the natural layer of enamel. ADNFCR-2621-ID-800692835-ADNFCR

Drinking and smoking ‘can damage oral health’

Fri

Drinking and smoking 'can damage oral health'Young individuals looking to reduce the risk of needing emergency dentistry should avoid smoking and alcohol consumption, it has been suggested.

According to the British Dental Health Foundation (BDHF), underage people who take part in the acts could increase their chance of developing gum disease.

This news follows research from the NHS information centre, which revealed that 45 per cent of youngsters had consumed alcohol, while 27 per cent admitted to smoking.

Dr Nigel Carter, chief executive of the BDHF, urged parents to take action to prevent their children from taking part in the potentially dangerous activities.

"Smoking and alcohol are also the two predominant causes of mouth cancer and when combined they increase the risk of getting the disease by up to 30 times," he added.

Earlier this month, the BDHF warned teenage smokers about the dangers of neglecting their basic oral hygiene routines in a bid to reduce the risk of a number of health issues.ADNFCR-2621-ID-800638495-ADNFCR

Twelve businesses receive slice of BDHF oral health fund

Fri

Twelve businesses receive slice of BDHF oral health fundEmergency dentistry patients looking for new ways to improve their oral health could be interested in a recent announcement from the British Dental Health Foundation (BDHF).

On Wednesday (July 20th), the organisation revealed that twelve practices had qualified for increased investment provided by the Oral Health Education Project.

As part of the scheme, which was created with assistance from the Wrigley Tooth Fairy Fund, the successful companies will carry out educational programmes in a bid to raise awareness about healthy teeth and gums.

The money is set to go towards helping disadvantaged families and the elderly, including in-patients during hospital stays.

Dr Nigel Carter, chief executive of the BDHF, said: "As well as lobbying government to keep oral health a priority, we will continue to work hard to secure new funding to help more projects in the future."

News of the initiative comes after the organisation revealed that people spending time in hospital could see their oral health deteriorate due to lack of care.ADNFCR-2621-ID-800630543-ADNFCR

Poor oral health ‘more common among youngsters who smoke’

Mon

Poor oral health 'more common among youngsters who smoke'Emergency dentistry patients looking to improve their oral health could be interested in the latest news from the British Dental Health Foundation (BDHF).

According to the organisation, researchers have established a link between poor dental wellbeing and people who smoke from an early age.

Published in the Journal of Clinical Periodontology, the study revealed that young adults are more likely to brush their teeth less often as a result of their lifestyle choices.

The research, which was led by Professor Sisko Honkala from Kuwait University, comes after previous findings that cited peer pressure as the most important factor in adolescent smoking.

BDHF chief executive Dr Nigel Carter, said: "Multiple unhealthy behaviours, particularly at an age when you are still developing, can have a lasting impact."

Netdoctor advises individuals of all ages to consume a wide variety of nutritious food, including kiwi fruit, celery and sesame seeds, to help maintain overall oral health.ADNFCR-2621-ID-800625553-ADNFCR

Pregnant women ‘could see changes to their oral health’

Thu

Pregnant women 'could see changes to their oral health'Expectant mothers looking to prevent emergency dentistry should attend regular check-ups with their dental practitioner in a bid to monitor their oral health, according to an expert.

Dr Nigel Carter from the British Dental Health Foundation (BDHF) has revealed that hormone changes occurring during pregnancy may cause inflammation of the gums.

His advice comes after a study from the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology established a link between mothers with poor oral health and similar issues among their children.

Dr Carter advised women to look out for any changes to their dental health during pregnancy, as well as increased bleeding of the gums.

"Women particularly during the time of their pregnancy must keep a high standard of oral hygiene, which includes visiting their dentist regularly," he explained.

In addition, appointments with a dental hygienist who can offer advice and guidance – as well as provide thorough cleaning – have been recommended for expectant mothers.ADNFCR-2621-ID-800621381-ADNFCR

Post-menopausal women ‘more likely to suffer tooth loss’

Wed

Post-menopausal women 'more likely to suffer tooth loss'Older individuals who have received emergency dentistry may be interested in recent research reported by the British Dental Health Foundation (BDHF).

As part of a new study, US scientists have revealed that women who have gone through the menopause are at increased risk of tooth loss over a five-year period.

The findings, acquired using the records of more than 1,000 women, also revealed that the likelihood increased to 90 per cent if the patient had diabetes or smoked.

Published in Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, the study aims to provide information to help high-risk groups.

"It is clearly a period of life when special attention needs to be given to maintaining good oral health," remarked Dr Nigel Carter, chief executive of the BDHF.

Senior Oral Care recommends older people attend regular dental check-ups in a bid to ensure oral health is maintained and the risk of developing infection is reduced.ADNFCR-2621-ID-800620253-ADNFCR

Mothers with poor oral health ‘can increase likelihood of tooth loss in children’

Tue

Mothers with poor oral health 'can increase likelihood of tooth loss in children'Parents looking to limit the chances of their child needing emergency dentistry could be interested in the findings from a new study.

According to the British Dental Health Foundation (BDHF), mothers with poor oral health could pass on the same issues to their children in later life.

The research, conducted by scientists in New Zealand, revealed that 45.1 per cent of youngsters whose mothers had dental health problems suffered from severe tooth decay.

Strengthening the belief that oral health is affected by genetic and environmental factors, the research consisted of over 1,000 children born in 1972 and 1973.

"We must target parents to educate their children in the hope they can better their own oral health and pass the message on to future generations," remarked Dr Nigel Carter, chief executive of the BDHF.

The findings emerged after previous research established a link between women with gum disease and difficulty with conception.ADNFCR-2621-ID-800618419-ADNFCR

Individuals ‘should not take their dental health for granted’

Fri

Individuals 'should not take their dental health for granted'Emergency dentistry patients should not take their oral health for granted during their efforts to prevent wider health issues, an expert has claimed.

Dr Nigel Carter, chief executive of the British Dental Health Foundation (BDHF), has urged individuals to take increased care of their teeth in a bid to prevent the onset of illnesses.

His advice came after researchers from the University of Western Australia revealed that women with poor oral hygiene could experience difficulty getting pregnant.

The scientists discovered that females with gum disease took an average of two months longer to conceive than those without dental health problems.

Previous studies have shown individuals with high standards of oral health are at limited risk of developing heart disease, type 2 diabetes and strokes, Dr Carter remarked.

He added: "This is yet another indication that we should not take our oral health for granted. Conception is the latest in a long line of problems associated with gum disease."ADNFCR-2621-ID-800615763-ADNFCR

Cutting down on coloured food ‘could provide natural teeth whitening’

Tue

Cutting down on coloured food 'could provide natural teeth whitening'Image-conscious individuals contemplating teeth whitening procedures could be interested in recommendations from the British Dental Health Foundation (BDHF).

According to the organisation's chief executive Dr Nigel Carter, limiting the consumption of coloured food and drink could be a natural method of protecting smiles.

His comments emerge after the Scottish Daily Herald reported actor James McAvoy had succumbed to Hollywood pressure and received cosmetic dentistry.

The X-Men star reportedly decided to get his teeth whitened and straightened, despite previous claims he was unwilling to change his appearance for his job.

Dr Carter insisted that before opting for such procedures, it is vital that people adopt an at-home routine to ensure overall oral health is maintained.

He recommended the use of fluoride toothpaste in a bid to remove often unsightly stains caused by smoking, red wine or coffee.

"Whitening toothpaste may also help the effect last, once your teeth have been professionally whitened," he added.ADNFCR-2621-ID-800611194-ADNFCR

Below are some genuine reviews of our services from independent sources

Reputation Reviews