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Dentaid pilot project extends to Bradford

Wed

Dentaid pilot project extends to Bradford

 

Dentaid pilot project extends to Bradford to target vulnerable patients. The charity is well known for its work at home and abroad and offers dental care to refugees and third world countries. However, Dentaid’s newest project focuses closer to home. They have rolled out a new project in Yorkshire and the Humber to focus on providing dental care to patients most in need.

The new scheme involves newly qualified dentists providing dental care and treatment to Bradford’s most vulnerable. This includes refugees, the homeless and people suffering from addiction. The new dentists offer their time free of charge which, therefore, helps them to develop and gain valuable experience. Since December, Dentaid has hosted five clinics. The clinics have been a huge success.

Dentaid has contributed equipment and portable dental chairs to the initiative. As a result, this donation ensures that treatment can be carried out more effectively. They are hoping to roll out similar services to other parts of the country in the near future. Colgate are also supporting the pilot scheme. Due to this, it means that free toothbrushes and toothpaste are readily available to those who desperately need them.

 

Pearl Dental Clinic is open 7 days a week from 9am to 9pm. You can book an appointment by calling us on 0208 547 9997 or emailing us or booking an appointment online

3D printed teeth become a reality

Sun

3D printed teeth become a reality

Thanks to a collaboration between Dubai’s Middle East Dental Laboratory and Sinterex, 3D printed teeth become a reality. The process uses a 3D printer to achieve natural looking dental implant bridges. The printed teeth are stunningly realistic, making it near impossible to tell the difference. The new technology will also speed up the process of creating dental bridges.

The 3D printing process starts by distributing thin layers of metal powder across a platform. This is then selectively melted by a laser. The use of the laser gives the implants their shape and definition. The implants then have metal parts added to them. These are used to attach it to the patient’s bone. Finally, ceramic is applied. The ceramic gives the implants an even and natural finish which replicates the look of tooth enamel.

Managing Director of Sinterex, Julian Callanan, has been quoted in the media saying, “Using our state of the art 3D printing technology we have been able to produce a highly accurate metal framework in only 4 hours.” This breakthrough is huge in terms of production within the dental industry. 3D printing will increase the speed in which dentists can produce moulds, therefore keeping the patient happy and increasing profits at the same time.

 

Pearl Dental Clinic is open 7 days a week from 9am to 9pm. You can book an appointment by calling us on 0208 547 9997 or emailing us or booking an appointment online

Dentist saves butcher’s life

Mon

Greenock butcher, William Murdoch, visited his dentist with what he thought was toothache, but what unfolded came as a complete shock. Mr Murdoch was actually suffering from a potentially deadly form of mouth cancer, which was only discovered due to his dentist’s vigilance.

During his visit, dentist Catriona Amadei extracted his tooth, only to find a lump in the gum which she immediately knew was cause for concern. Mr Murdoch was referred to the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Glasgow, where he did not even need a biopsy to confirm the lump was cancerous. Ms Amadei says that this shows the importance of regular check-ups with a dentist, as they may be able to spot early signs of mouth cancer that might not be obvious to the untrained eye.

William admitted to the Greenock Telegraph that if it was not for his dentist appointment things could have been very different, “A visit to the dentist really did save my life. My surgeon told me that I now need to get a 12-hour reconstruction operation to remove the lump or I will die. I can’t help thinking what would have happened if I hadn’t gone to the dentist when I did.” Mouth cancer rates have seen a rise of around thirty nine percent throughout the last ten years. In some cases, the symptoms do not present themselves until the disease is more advanced, however dentists are more likely to spot the signs earlier.

 

 

 

UK urged to stop using amalgam fillings

Sun

Amalgam fillings, which are a mixture of liquid mercury and powdered alloys of tin, copper, and silver, have long been a source of controversy in the dental world. Many dentists, consumers and health environment organisations are calling for a complete ban on the substance, especially for use in pregnant women and children, due to health risks. The other aspect of the debate centers on the environmental impact. Secondary poisoning of fish and wildlife, as well as its effects on water, air and land are also at the forefront of the campaign.
Dr Graeme Munro-Hall, a British dentist, made a public statement explaining the current situation, “British dentists increasingly realize that the end is near for amalgam. Alternatives are available, affordable, and effective. It is time for the UK to say good-bye to amalgam, a material clearly inferior to composite or ionomers.”
Europe is the world’s biggest user of amalgam at present, which makes this a worrying factor. Three members from the European Parliament have distributed petitions calling for support in banning its use. Currently the petition holds over seventeen thousand names and is still growing. Representatives from European institutions are due to meet on the 6th December to discuss the regulations on the use of mercury, which includes its use in dentistry.

 

Dentist’s dismay over Coca Cola truck visit to Wales

Sun

The famous Coca Cola truck is due to visit Wales in a matter of days, touring all around the country. With many of the public having expressed interest and excitement in going to see the truck, local dentists have a different view on the festivities.

The truck is synonymous with the yule tide season, due to many years of expensive marketing, advertisements, and promotion. Coca Cola have also played a big part in shaping the image of Santa over the years as a jolly, red coat wearing, present bringer. The issue that dentists have with the popular drink, besides the sugar content, is the acids levels that are present in them, even with diet Coca Cola there are still risks of enamel corrosion. The pH level of water is 7, which is neutral, however Coca Cola’s typical pH is between 2.5 to 4.2. Anything under a pH of 5.5 will destroy the tooth enamel over time.

Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University’s public health visitor, Jane O’Kane, had this to say, “We know that the acids in fizzy drinks erode tooth enamel which can lead to tooth decay. Our strong advice to parents is that children only need to drink water and milk, which have a neutral pH level in the mouth.”

 

 

 

Top UK dentist says six month visits to the dentist are not necessary

Sat

Dr Sara Hurley, England’s chief dental officer, has advised patients to question dentists who dictate that everyone should attend a check-up every six months. Current guidelines state that the waiting times between check-ups should very much depend on the dental health of individuals, rather than a blanket rule for everyone. A patient with good dental health could go up to two years without needing a visit, however, the recommended time is around one year.

Earlier in the week, Dr Hurley likened dental practitioners to mechanics, and said that patients should not feel that they need to ‘blindly adhere’ to a dentist’s request for frequent check-up appointments. She also suggested that patients should be less trusting of dentists who make these demands.

In an investigation last year, it emerged that the highest earning dentists in the industry brought home, on average, near to £700,000 annually. Roy Lilley, the former NHS trust chairman, spoke out at the recent NHS Expo conference, that was held in Manchester, saying that, “Dentistry has become a rich man’s hobby. It has gone off the high street into lavish surroundings.” Dr Hurley responded at the conference by saying that unnecessary repeat visits were due to the misconception that check-ups should be done every six months, and that some dentists were not adhering to these guidelines.

 

 

 

MPs concerned over access to NHS dental treatment

Fri

Lack of access to NHS dental treatment, including other NHS services, has got MPs worried. Concerns were raised before the summer holiday period and have been highlighted again this week. Exeter Labour MP, Ben Bradshaw, expressed concern by stating that he was ‘extremely worried’ about what impact the hefty waiting lists were having on people’s dental health. Bradshaw feels that the system is reverting back to pre-Labour government days, where people are unable to get in a dentist.

The lack of services could be due, in part, to the rule established in 2006 where dentists are not able to set up in practice unless they have been commissioned to do so. Some existing local NHS dentists say they are at breaking point due to extremely high patient caseloads. One dentist explained that the waiting lists are huge and their NHS books are that full they physically cannot take any more patients. Practices in Exeter have taken to contacting patients on their waiting lists to enquire whether they are still wanting treatment or not, and if not removing them in an attempt to shorten the waiting times for new registrations.

The concerns are growing and MPs are likely to keep this issues in the forefront of their discussions in the immediate future.

Dentist’s council against using charcoal to whiten teeth

Thu

 

The latest tooth whitening trend is to use charcoal like toothpaste to break down stains, but now dentists are voicing concerns about the practice and recommending that people who want whiter teeth do it properly at the dentist, instead of trying home remedies that could be damaging to their teeth.

It has been suggested that the practice of brushing charcoal onto the teeth could cause enamel erosion and tooth sensitivity with prolonged use, as well as minimal whitening with deep staining. Speaking to FoxNews.com Dr Susan Maples said that there is no evidence to suggest that brushing teeth with charcoal is going to successfully whiten them but it could damage them permanently. Dr Maples added that there could long-term effects to this type of DIY dental treatment because tooth enamel does not grow back once it has worn away.

Instead of damaging their teeth, Dr Maples added that patients who want to get whiter teeth should use approved products or ‘at-home whitening trays provided by their dentist’ instead of utilising home remedies that might cause injuries to the teeth.

 

Dentists say you DO have to floss

Mon

After health officials in the US branded flossing a waste of time dentists are quickly jumping to the defence of the daily technique and saying that you should be flossing to keep your teeth and gums healthy. Far from wasting your time, dentists say that flossing can keep teeth strong and help prevent gum disease, as well as other health problems.

The general public are understandably confused about who they should be listening to, after the American Dental Association waded in on the argument last week, saying that just because there is no strong evidence to support flossing, it doesn’t mean that it is not effective at preventing disease and keeping teeth healthy.

Gum disease can lead to heart disease and other conditions, studies have suggested, and dentists are now saying that flossing can stop the damaging bacterium from spreading into the blood stream and causing disastrous health problems for the rest of the body. If practiced correctly, flossing could protect against memory loss and even dementia, according to some research. Flossing should also be combined with brushing twice a day for at least two minutes, in order to maintain a good level of oral health.

 

Dentists may have extracted thousands of teeth unnecessarily

Wed

 

An investigation into NHS dental treatment has revealed that many dentists could have unnecessarily chosen to extract thousands of teeth simply because it is a faster and simpler procedure than trying to restore the tooth using a filling or root canal treatment.

According to The Times, dentists are earning more money by treating a greater number of patients on a daily basis, which would not be possible if they opted for more complicated treatments, instead of just pulling out bad teeth. Reforms introduced in 2006 meant that dentists are paid per ‘Unit of Dental Activity (UDA)’, with regular check-ups counting for one unit and root canals for three – although root canals take at least twice as long as an extraction.

Mike Waplington, president of the British Endodontic Society, said that the  number of root canal treatments had dropped by half, whilst extractions were up by a fifth following the new rules of treatment. He said that there is an ‘incentive’ for dentists to extract the teeth rather than treat them with a longer procedure that does not benefit them as well financially. He added that this system could ‘have affected tens of thousands of teeth.’

 

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