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Cut out caffeine ‘to stop tooth grinding’

Thu

Cut out caffeine 'to stop tooth grinding'Regularly grinding teeth can put individuals at risk of needing emergency dentistry to repair tooth and jaw damage, according to one industry commentator.

Writing for the Chicago Tribune, Alison Johnson claimed that 20 per cent of adults suffer from the disorder and advised people on what to do to help prevent them from clenching their teeth at night.

Getting a professionally made mouthguard is a good idea she said, as they disable the ability to rub teeth together while sleeping.

More basic methods recommended included relaxing the mouth during the day by not clenching and attempting to reduce stress through exercise, deep breathing and meditation.

Equally beneficial are cutting out caffeine and alcohol before bed and unwinding with a bath or glass of warm milk, she suggested.

Ms Johnson explained that worn teeth, jaw pain, headaches and gum sensitivity are all signs of a grinding problem and it is important to seek medical guidance if the issue persists instead of relying on pain relief.

Dental splint specialist S4S will be running a campaign from October 25th to 31st to highlight the condition and raise awareness.ADNFCR-2621-ID-19855864-ADNFCR

Brushing ‘important for milk teeth’

Fri

Brushing children’s teeth twice daily is important as the enamel on milk teeth is less dense than in adult teeth, it has been stated.

My Joy Online reported that the millions of bacteria that live in the mouth can “cause havoc” for milk teeth if they are not regularly brushed away and this can lead to problems such as toothache and decay.

Indeed, the publication noted that once the enamel is weakened, bacteria have access to the softer dentine underneath and this can quickly be eroded, exposing the nerve of the tooth and causing considerable pain.

Elsewhere, the Chicago Tribune recently reported that individuals who suffer from asthma have been advised that using toothpaste designed to tackle sensitive teeth problems could help with their condition.

It revealed that the active ingredient in many of these toothpastes is potassium nitrate – also known as saltpetre – and this was used for many years in the treatment of arthritis and asthma.ADNFCR-2621-ID-19804931-ADNFCR

Teeth whitening treatments ‘do work’

Tue

People looking to improve the brightness of their smile have been advised that teeth whitening works.

People hoping to whiten their teeth using well-rounded oral health routine and the help of some whitening toothpaste can take heart that the method does work.

A blogger on Truth In Aging stated that she spends two minutes each night brushing her teeth using whitening toothpaste and targets difficult stains with teeth whitening strips.

“Afterward, my teeth seem more polished (due to sodium bicarbonate), protected (from attack by bacteria) and sparkling. Specific stains fade within a week and my oral hygiene appreciates the added step,” the unnamed blogger wrote.

However, she did advise not to be overly vigorous with whitening procedures, as sensitive gums can be extremely painful.

Elsewhere, the Chicago Tribune recently reported that individuals who suffer from asthma could use teeth whitening toothpaste to help tackle their symptoms.

The publication noted that these toothpastes contain saltpetre – a compound which was advised in the treatment of asthma and arthritis for many years.

Toothpaste ‘could help asthma sufferers’

Sat

Desensitising toothpaste could help asthma sufferers.

Individuals who suffer from asthma have been advised that using toothpaste designed to tackle sensitive teeth problems could help with their condition.

According to the Chicago Tribune, the active ingredient in many of these toothpastes is potassium nitrate – also known as saltpetre – and this was used for many years in the treatment of arthritis and asthma, hence its ability to help sufferers.

Meanwhile, Ridzwan Rahim recently wrote in a post for New Straits Times that the introduction of fluoride into the drinking water of western countries in the last century was one of the greatest man-made medical advances of all time.

He argued that the introduction of fluoride into the water of countries across the globe has had the single greatest impact on oral health.

Mr Rahim stated: “Ever since the introduction of fluoride into tap water in 1945, cases of tooth decay around the world has decreased so dramatically that, frankly, we have now few reasons to visit the dentist.”

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