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Sports stars ‘are needing emergency dentistry due to sports drinks’

Fri

Is your sports drink causing you to need emergency dentistry?Athletes are increasingly needing emergency dentistry because sports drinks are damaging their teeth, one expert has warned.

Dr Brett Dorney told ABC Grandstand Sport that he first noticed problems with athletes' teeth in Sydney in 1995, when the drinks began to be introduced to boost performance.

He explained it is now a widespread problem, meaning that many "elite athletes do not have elite mouths".

Problems occur because the drinks are acidic, adding to the acid being produced by bacteria already in the mouth to cause decay.

Sports dietitian Emma Rippon said people do not need to stop having these drinks altogether, but recommended squirting them to the back of the mouth and not consuming them while wearing a mouthguard, which can trap the liquid close to the teeth.

This follows a study by Tufts University professor of nutrition and oral health Carole Palmer, who found that people who sip sweet drinks slowly over the course of a few hours – or constantly drink sugary coffee while they work – are most at risk of decay, Time magazine reported.ADNFCR-2621-ID-800468397-ADNFCR

Rise in VAT ‘could lead to decrease in emergency dentistry cases’

Tue

Fewer cases of emergency dentistry could be an unexpected result of the recent VAT rise. An oral healthcare expert has said that he hopes the recent rise in VAT will lead to fewer cases of emergency dentistry in the UK.

According to Kennedy's Confection magazine editor, companies like Cadbury's and Mars are to cut the sizes of their chocolate bars in order to keep prices the same, with a packet of Maltesers to fall from 140g to 120g, Dentistry.co.uk reports.

British Dental Health Foundation chief executive Dr Nigel Carter told the website that he hopes this may have a positive knock-on effect on emergency dentistry due to the reduction of sugar consumption.

"A sweet treat for the taste buds creates an acid attack for the teeth. In turn, too frequent consumption of any confectionery could lead to a mouth of decayed teeth," he pointed out.

Back in August 2010, Tufts University professor of nutrition and oral health Carole Palmer warned people that sipping sugary drinks slowly rather than drinking them in one go could lead to more tooth decay, Time magazine reported.
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Brushing teeth after snacking ‘could result in emergency dentistry’

Thu

How brushing teeth can actually lead to emergency dentistry.Although brushing teeth is generally seen as a way of preventing emergency dentistry, doing it too soon after eating sugary snacks could actually cause decay.

This is according to Lucy Elkins of the Daily Mail, who explained that after eating sugary foods, the environment in your mouth becomes acidic, causing tooth enamel to soften slightly.

"If you then brush your teeth straight away, you will brush away some of the enamel, leading to tooth erosion and sensitivity," she warned.

Ms Elkins recommended waiting half an hour after eating sweet treats before brushing the teeth.

She also urged Britons not to rinse too thoroughly after cleaning teeth in the evenings, as this will wash away the flouride that can help to guard against decay overnight when saliva levels are low.

In August 2010, Tufts University professor of nutrition and oral health Carole Palmer recommended limiting the total time that sugar spends in your mouth to prevent cavities.
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‘Take care at Halloween’ to avoid emergency dentistry

Wed

Avoid emergency dentistry on Halloween.   People intending to join in the festivities of Halloween later this month should take care of their teeth if they want to avoid emergency dentistry.

This is the advice of Dr Gilbert Snow from Los Angeles, who told UPI.com that some dentists report an increase in activity of between ten and 20 per cent after October 31st each year because so many people damage their teeth.

He pointed out that sweets, bobbing for apples and over-cooked party food can also result in chipped teeth and lost molars.

Dr Snow said both children and adults should take extra care on Halloween when it comes to brushing and flossing, as well as removing sweets that are too hard from trick or treat bags.

In August 2010, Tufts University professor of nutrition and oral health Carole Palmer recommended limiting the total time that sugar spends in your mouth to prevent cavities.

“Remember, of course, that gulping down sugar may not be wonderful for the rest of your body either,” she added.
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Dental groups’ campaign hopes to reduce emergency dentistry among children

Fri

The British Dental Health Foundation has joined an oral health drive.The British Dental Health Foundation (BDHF) has added its backing to a campaign that aims to reduce the occurrence of emergency dentistry procedures among children.

It is now part of the British Dental Trade Association’s ‘Kick out the sweets, bring on the healthy treats’ drive, part of the government’s Change4Life scheme.

The resources created as part of this initiative are designed to help parents learn how to provide healthy choices for their children and prevent tooth decay.

Chief executive of the BDHF Dr Nigel Carter said he is concerned the UK has developed an unhealthy relationship with sugary drinks and foods.

“Trying to offer other rewards can reap benefits for both dental and general health of the child,” he added.

In August this year, a study by Tufts University professor of nutrition and oral health Carole Palmer found that people who sip sugary drinks slowly throughout the day could be increasing their likelihood of needing emergency dentistry.
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Water and milk ‘are best drinks to help avoid emergency dentistry’

Wed

To avoid needing emergency dentistry, drink water and milk.People who hope to avoid emergency dentistry in the future could consider drinking only milk and water and giving their children the same.

This is the advice of the British Dental Health Foundation (BDHF), which said sugary drinks are a real problem when it comes to damaging teeth, but water and milk are completely safe.

“It contains no sugar, no calories and no acid and … it is massively important to a person’s overall health,” said Dr Nigel Carter, BDHF spokesperson.

This comes after Scottish Water launched a campaign to get people to drink more H2O during the day, with its product having been given BDHF’s seal of approval.

Earlier this month, Tufts University professor of nutrition and oral health Carole Palmer said people who sip sugary drinks slowly could be at risk of needing emergency dentistry, whereas those who drink them quickly – for example, at the gym – could be safer.
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Drinking sugary drinks slowly ‘could create need for emergency dentistry’

Wed

Regularly sipping sugary drinks might generate a need for emergency dentistry.The amount of time people spend sipping sugary drinks could affect the likelihood of them needing emergency dentistry.

Although it is widely known that too much sugar causes cavities, a study by Tufts University professor of nutrition and oral health Carole Palmer has found that people who consume sugary gym drinks rapidly may avoid dental health problems.

It was those who sipped sweet drinks slowly over the course of a few hours – or constantly drank sugary coffee while they worked – who were most at risk of decay, Time magazine reports.

“To prevent cavities, you should limit the total time that sugar spends in your mouth. Remember, of course, that gulping down sugar may not be wonderful for the rest of your body either,” Ms Palmer commented.

Earlier this month, people with tongue piercings were warned they may develop a need for cosmetic dentistry.

Academics from Buffalo University in New York found the studs could move teeth and create gaps by regularly banging against them.ADNFCR-2621-ID-800021982-ADNFCR

Will these tips help avoid emergency dentistry?

Fri

Some commonly believed facts that could lead to dental problems have been refuted by a US scientist.A scientist from a US dental school has debunked some myths that may lead to emergency dentistry.

Tufts University School of Dental Medicine faculty member Carole Palmer said that poor oral health could have far-reaching effects, especially for pregnant women.

She suggested that eating poorly could lead to babies’ mouths and teeth not developing properly, which may cause them to need cosmetic dentistry in later life.

“Oral complications combined with poor diet can also contribute to cognitive and growth problems and can contribute to obesity,” she explained, warning parents to make sure their children have healthy diets.

Osteoporosis can cause tooth loss, she added, advising the elderly not to become complacent as they age because chronic health conditions, more common in later life, can lead to gum disease.

A recent study found that type two diabetes can double the chances of losing teeth.

Ms Palmer also reminded people that baby teeth should not be lost to tooth decay if possible and that sugar is not the only cause of dental problems.ADNFCR-2621-ID-800015105-ADNFCR

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