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Poor oral health ‘more common among youngsters who smoke’

Mon

Poor oral health 'more common among youngsters who smoke'Emergency dentistry patients looking to improve their oral health could be interested in the latest news from the British Dental Health Foundation (BDHF).

According to the organisation, researchers have established a link between poor dental wellbeing and people who smoke from an early age.

Published in the Journal of Clinical Periodontology, the study revealed that young adults are more likely to brush their teeth less often as a result of their lifestyle choices.

The research, which was led by Professor Sisko Honkala from Kuwait University, comes after previous findings that cited peer pressure as the most important factor in adolescent smoking.

BDHF chief executive Dr Nigel Carter, said: "Multiple unhealthy behaviours, particularly at an age when you are still developing, can have a lasting impact."

Netdoctor advises individuals of all ages to consume a wide variety of nutritious food, including kiwi fruit, celery and sesame seeds, to help maintain overall oral health.ADNFCR-2621-ID-800625553-ADNFCR

Public ‘could put oral health at risk during summer holidays’

Mon

Public 'could put oral health at risk during summer holidays'Individuals who are enjoying summer holidays have been advised to monitor their sugar intake in a bid to limit their chances of needing emergency dentistry.

The British Dental Health Foundation (BDHF) has issued members of the public with an urgent warning about the high sugar content in a variety of drinks.

Addressing common changes to normal dietary habits during warmer months, the organisation encouraged families to adopt reliable routines to maintain oral health.

In addition, the charity provided holidaymakers with an online chart highlighting substances with potentially harmful amounts of sugar, such as wine and salad dressing.

Dr Nigel Carter, chief executive of the BDHF, said: "Eating and drinking naturally weakens the enamel on your teeth, and as a result, the foundation recommends eating three square meals a day instead of having seven to ten 'snack attacks'."

Medic8.com recommends healthy snacks such as raw vegetables and whole-grain crackers as an alternative to sugary sweets and biscuits.ADNFCR-2621-ID-800610614-ADNFCR

Cosmetic dentistry ‘could make people more attractive’

Fri

Cosmetic dentistry 'could make people more attractive'Image-conscious individuals seeking cosmetic dentistry to improve their appearance could be encouraged by new research.

According to the Los Angeles Times, scientists from the Virginia Commonwealth University set out to examine the effects of straight teeth on people's perception of attractiveness.

The study aimed to investigate the belief that individuals with crooked smiles may receive negative judgement from their peers.

In a bid to explore this perception, the researchers selected volunteers between ten and 16 years old and digitally altered their photographs to display even or misaligned teeth.

Plans to conduct the study emerge after research published by the British Dental Health Foundation (BDHF) revealed a nice smile was the most popular feature among people looking for a partner.

Receiving 56 per cent of the overall vote, the importance of maintaining good oral health was highlighted as a significant social factor, as well as medical.

In addition, the BDHF study showed that 51 per cent of participants found nice eyes to be the most attractive feature in a potential mate.ADNFCR-2621-ID-800608338-ADNFCR

DNA testing ‘could treat gum disease’

Thu

DNA testing 'could treat gum disease'People wishing to avoid emergency dentistry treatments for gum disease may be interested to learn that a new study has been commissioned in the US to help determine those who may be at the highest risk.

The University of Michigan's School of Dentistry is examining the DNA of 4,000 participants to see if there is a genetic test that can be carried out to show those who may have a higher risk of developing the condition, the British Dental Health Foundation reports.

Dr Nigel Carter, chief executive of the BDHF, commented: "To have the capability to predict gum disease at an early stage, or even before it happens, obviously has remarkable advantages to our oral health."

According to the NHS, people can help to avoid the onset of gum disease by having a good oral health routine.

This includes brushing teeth for two to three minutes twice per day, as well as using a toothpaste that contains fluoride, flossing two to three times per week and making regular trips to the dentist.

In addition, smokers are advised that the habit means they are at a much higher risk of developing the problem. ADNFCR-2621-ID-800607786-ADNFCR

Hospital stays ‘can have negative impact on oral health’

Wed

Hospital stays 'can have negative impact on oral health'Emergency dentistry patients could be interested to hear that the oral health of hospital patients has been overlooked by medical professionals, a new study has suggested.

Data collected from the UK, US, France and the Netherlands has revealed that unwell individuals are often at increased risk of developing plaque and inflammation as a result of staff shortcomings, the British Dental Health Foundation has revealed.

Based on five studies conducted between 1998 and 2009, the research discovered that patients with breathing problems are under threat of deteriorating oral health.

A decline in overall wellbeing and quality of life was also linked to the negative effect on nutritional status caused by long stays in hospital.

Dr Nigel Carter, chief executive of the BDHF, said: "The help of close family and friends during hospital stays can make a difference to this aspect of their care and wellbeing and more should be done to encourage their involvement."

This news comes after the BDHF called for increased research into the benefits of using an artificial nose to detect the early signs of oral cancer.ADNFCR-2621-ID-800603831-ADNFCR

Emergency dentistry news: Erectile dysfunction ‘linked to gum disease’

Wed

Emergency dentistry news: Erectile dysfunction 'linked to gum disease'Health-conscious men looking to prevent visits to an emergency dentist could be interested to hear findings from a new study.

According to the research, males who contract gum disease due to poor oral hygiene are more likely to experience problems achieving an erection.

Statistics revealed that 81.8 per cent of participants who were unable to perform sexually were also found to suffer from bleeding and inflammation of the gums.

Affecting one in ten men internationally, erectile dysfunction was found to be less common in men with satisfactory oral health.

Dr Nigel Carter, chief executive of the BDHF, said: "To associate gum disease, the major preventable cause of tooth loss in adults, with such a taboo subject amongst males is not something that should be taken lightly."

Men who experience difficulty achieving an erection are often found to have a reduced quality of life, which can lead to insecurity and embarrassment in their partner, according to NHS Choices. ADNFCR-2621-ID-800603712-ADNFCR

BDHF calls for support amid government cuts

Thu

BDHF calls for support amid government cutsDental professionals need to take more action to ensure the public continue to improve their oral health, experts have claimed.

The British Dental Health Foundation (BDHF) has called for increased support from dentists to promote the benefits of healthy teeth and gums amid government cuts.

Following the organisation's success over the past 12 months, the BDHF has predicted that the ongoing recession could place pressure on campaign funds.

After spending £998,464 on oral health promotion last year, the foundation has called for alternative methods to continue its educational work.

Chief executive Dr Nigel Carter said: "There is growing concern that the economic slow-down is affecting oral health promotion and putting hard won improvements over recent years at risk."

Yesterday (June 14th), the BDHF announced the end of this year's National Smile Campaign, which aimed to educate people of varying ages about the benefits of oral hygiene.

As part of the scheme, the foundation urged medical professionals to get involved to encourage healthier teeth and gums throughout their local towns.ADNFCR-2621-ID-800581442-ADNFCR

Emergency dentistry news: Chocolate ‘makes people smile the most’

Thu

Emergency dentistry news: Chocolate 'makes people smile the most'Patients concerned about needing to see an emergency dentist could be interested to hear that chocolate has topped a poll of things that make people smile.

Research conducted by the British Dental Health Foundation (BDHF) revealed that 60 per cent of female respondents named the sweet their favourite choice.

Carried out to mark the end of this year's National Smile Month, experts discovered that seeing a loved one was the second most popular activity.

With chocolate topping the list for the majority of women, male respondents were found to favour a roast dinner to the sugary snack.

Dr Nigel Carter, chief executive of the BDHF, said: "Chocolate may not be the best thing for your teeth, but if everyone follows the Foundation's three rules for good oral health, it's something that we can all continue to enjoy."

The launch of the campaign, which ended yesterday, was held at the Houses of Parliament last month in a bid to encourage people to adopt effective oral health routines.ADNFCR-2621-ID-800580825-ADNFCR

Teeth whitening news: BDHF announce Smile Factor winner

Wed

Teeth whitening news: BDHF announce Smile Factor winnerIndividuals thinking about receiving teeth whitening treatment to brighten their pearly whites could be encouraged to hear the results of a contest held by the British Dental Health Foundation (BDHF).

As part of its National Smile Month campaign, the organisation has revealed the winner of its Smile Factor competition, which aims to bring good news to individuals.

Recipient Phyllis Samuels was given a glamorous transformation as part of her prize, which she won following a tough childhood and battle with cancer.

Working alongside Dream Image North East, the BDHF aimed to put the smile back on the nation's face by telling Ms Samuels' inspiring story.

She said: "I had a phobia of the dentist and didn't feel comfortable going.

"Thanks to Dream Image North East, I'll have looks and a smile to be proud of."

The National Smile Month campaign, which ends today (June 15th), called for dental professionals and community groups to get involved with activities to increase awareness of the importance of good oral health. ADNFCR-2621-ID-800579254-ADNFCR

BDHF scheme proves popular among oral health staff

Mon

BDHF scheme proves popular among oral health staffEmergency dentists and fellow members of oral healthcare staff have applied to receive funding from a scheme launched by the British Dental Health Foundation (BDHF).

Carried out as part of its National Smile Month campaign, the BDHF has announced plans to inject increased investments into educating the public about healthy teeth.

The £100,000 donation, provided by the Wrigley's Tooth Fairy Fund, will go towards projects in a bid to promote oral healthcare across the country.

Qualifying organisations will be given the opportunity to outline their plans for educating people of all ages if they were to receive the additional money.

Dr Nigel Carter, chief executive of the BDHF, said: "The feedback from oral health educators has been very positive and for many organisations it provides an opportunity to fund projects which have been affected by limited funding."

Wrigley's recently revealed that 95 per cent of people regularly fail to take action to protect their teeth and gums after eating lunch.ADNFCR-2621-ID-800576940-ADNFCR

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