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Chemicals in toothpaste change taste receptors after brushing

Thu

According to researchers in America, chemicals contained in most toothpaste can change the taste receptors in the tongue, which explains why products like orange juice tastes so bitter after the teeth have been brushed. A new study has revealed that this sensation can be related to a chemical called sodium lauryl sulphate, a detergent that is commonly found in toothpaste.

The detergent suppresses sweet tastes on the tongue and breaks down the compounds that would stop bitter tastes from coming through. The findings were published as an online video journal called Reactions, which can be found on the American Chemical Society’s website. The video details the 10,000 taste buds and 100 taste receptors on the tongue, which are affected by the detergent found in the toothpaste.

The video specifies that the sweet receptors are inhibited and explains that ‘this opens up a clear pathway for bitter molecules to reach taste receptors in the mouth.’ The scientists goes on to say that this is the ‘most likely’ reason why orange juice changes taste from sweet to sour when drunk after the teeth have been brushed.

Patients ‘anxious over anaesthesia’

Tue

Anaesthesia in the dentist’s office causes anxiety for many. Many cosmetic dentistry patients get anxious by the thought of anaesthesia, a new survey has shown. Up to 85 per cent of people feel worried about the use of anaesthesia, according to a poll carried out by the University of Salford.  It showed that the top concerns were waking up during surgery, not waking up after the treatment and simply the general feeling of unease in the run-up to the procedure. Mark Mitchell, senior lecturer in the Faculty of Health and Social Care at the University of Salford, said: “Our survey underlines the importance of patients receiving planned and timely information about anaesthesia, prior to the day of surgery, in order to limit their dental anxiety.” Elsewhere, research carried out by Dr William H Frey and his colleagues at Regions Hospital in St Paul, Minnesota and published in the American Chemical Society’s bi-monthly journal Molecular Pharmaceutics showed the use of a nasal spray or drops in place of injections could be equally effective for anaesthetising patients who are undergoing treatments.

Nasal spray ‘to replace needles’

Mon

A new form of anaesthesia could replace needles for dentists.

Brits undergoing cosmetic dentistry procedures will soon be able to undergo local anaesthesia that does not entail large needles, it has been revealed.

According to an article in the American Chemical Society’s bi-monthly journal Molecular Pharmaceutics, researchers have found that the use of a nasal spray or drops in place of injections could be equally effective for anaesthetising patients who are undergoing treatments.

Dr William H Frey and his colleagues at Regions Hospital in St Paul, Minnesota, found that nasal sprays of lidocaine are extremely effective at acting on the trigeminal nerve – the nerve responsible for sensation in the face.

As such, the days of large needles to numb the teeth and gums could soon be coming to an end.

Elsewhere, US dentist Dr Joel Miller of Aesthetic Dentistry of Valencia recently told Homestation News that those suffering from bad breath should visit their dentist, as they can often provide stronger mouthwash that could tackle the problem effectively.

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